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Fujifilm XF 27mm f/2.8 Lens Review

Big sensor, small lens. Is this prime lens the ideal compromise for X-series shooters?

Credit: Reviewed.com / Brendan Nystedt
May 04, 2015
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Perhaps the best thing about mirrorless cameras like Fujifilm’s renowned X-series is getting the quality and performance of a DSLR in a compact form factor. While the pursuit of smaller proportions has led manufacturers like Olympus, Panasonic, and Nikon to design cameras with smaller image sensors (and thus smaller lenses), Fuji bet big on APS-C sensors—the kind used in most DSLRs.

The result is that while Fuji’s cameras are indeed much smaller than comparable DSLRs, its lenses are usually way bigger than Micro Four Thirds and Nikon 1 series glass. The Fujinon XF 27mm f/2.8 pancake lens was designed to address that size deficit, providing a useful "normal" focal length and a wide maximum aperture in a lens that’s just 0.9 inches thick.

In the lab, the Fuji 27mm proved to be a solid all-around performer, despite its small size; in the real world, we found it to be particularly well-suited to street shooting, though iffy bokeh and a less-than-exciting focal length don't always inspire the way many of Fuji's lenses can.

It's not the flat-out best lens in the brand’s lineup, but if you’re heading out for a full day of shooting it may be the only lens you need.

Who's It For?

Like all pancake lenses, the Fujinon XF27mm f/2.8 was designed for portability first and foremost. It perfectly complements the compact dimensions of Fujifilm’s X-series cameras, adding very little weight to the overall package. It’s the ideal companion for someone who wants to capture everyday snapshots, wants a little low-light flexibility, and doesn’t want anything big or bulky.

fuji-27mm-f-2p8-review-design-camera-top.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Chris Thomas
Like other XF series lenses, the 27mm f/2.8 doesn't have hard stops at the end of the manual focus range.

The biggest downside here is that it doesn’t focus very close, meaning it's not the best choice for candid, creative portraits. Another thing to be aware of is the lack of an aperture ring; physical (by wire) aperture rings have been a hallmark of Fujifilm's XF lenses from the get-go, and the 27mm is the only XF without one. That can make for some funky compatibility issues with low-end X-series cameras that have fewer programmable control dials.

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Look and Feel

There’s really not much to say about the Fuji 27mm f/2.8's handling, because there's not much to, you know, handle.

The lens is solidly built, with a tough plastic body, metal focus ring, and metal mount. It locks securely onto your camera while adding less than an inch of depth, and at less than 100 grams it weighs practically nothing. That makes it a great lens to leave on the camera instead of a body cap, so you’re ready to shoot at a moment’s notice.

Our one hangup is the lack of an aperture ring. Fujifilm designed its camera and lens system to attract camera enthusiasts, and part of the attraction has been a plethora of manual controls. But to make the XF 27mm as small as possible, the company's designers decided to discard the aperture ring.

fuji-27mm-f-2p8-review-design-camera-angle.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Chris Thomas
Encased in durable plastic, the XF 27mm f/2.8 features a metal focus ring and mount.

That means that you’ll need to control aperture via your camera body, which is sometimes easier said than done. Usually you can reassign aperture control to a custom button or dial, but that requires a trip into the menu; depending on your familiarity with the user interface, it can be a bit of a hassle. Worse still, some older bodies will require a firmware upgrade to properly make use of the 27mm f/2.8.

The lens is still fully usable even without direct aperture control if you use Auto, Program, or Shutter Priority shooting modes, but half the joy of shooting with an X-series camera is learning to control things manually. That normally goes for focus, as well, but the small focus ring isn't the easiest to focus with manually, even with Fujifilm's wide array of focus assist modes.

Image Quality

Though the Fujinon XF 27mm f/2.8's raison d'être is its compact footprint, it also needs to perform. Well, after putting it through its paces in our lab, we found it to be a solid (if not spectacular) prime lens that doesn't try to do too much. It's sharp in the center, but it lacks the superb corner-to-corner sharpness of the best prime lenses, going a little soft in the corners.

That isn't to say this is a bad lens. It has negligible chromatic aberration, minimal distortion, and the sharpness profile is quite good versus similarly sized (if not similarly prices) lenses. The only real hangups we have are with its mediocre bokeh, which isn't usual for a relatively wide and slow-aperture normal prime, and the truly dreadful f/16 performance. Seriously, avoid f/16 like the plague.

Below you can see sample photos taken with the Fujinon XF 27mm f/2.8 mounted on a Fujifilm X-T1. Click the link below each photo to download the full-resolution image.

Conclusion

From the outset, Fujifilm has been very clear regarding its vision for its mirrorless system. Rather than try to provide an all-encompassing assortment of lenses, the company has focused almost exclusively on well-built, wide-aperture lenses with retro appeal and physical controls. It's helped the brand carve out a distinct niche in a rapidly homogenizing market, but it also means that Fuji’s lenses are generally bigger than the competition.

The Fujinon 27mm f/2.8 finds a middle ground between enthusiast-oriented maximalism and the minimalism of rivals Olympus and Sony. It sheds Fuji's customary aperture ring in an effort to slim its profile to the bare minimum, but retains the series' high-quality build and respectable optical performance.

As a result, it’s significantly more portable than nearly every other lens in the X-series family—a great option for days when you're not necessarily interested in carrying a full kit around, but want to be ready just in case.

fuji-27mm-f-2p8-review-design-camera-side.jpg
Credit: Reviewed.com / Chris Thomas
What's missing from this picture? Yep, it's an aperture ring.

In and out of the lab, we found it to be a competent performer, capable of excellent photos under the right conditions. While best used for snapshot-style street shooting, it can nonetheless do virtually everything any other "normal" prime can do, including Fuji's own XF 35mm f/1.4.

More than anything, it reminded us of the 23mm f/2 found on Fuji's X100-series cameras. Though we like the X100’s lens quite a bit more, we found ourselves taking similar types of photos. If you've had trouble deciding between Fuji’s fixed-lens wonder and an X-series body, the 27mm f/2.8 could be a reasonable compromise.

If you've had trouble deciding between Fuji’s fixed-lens wonder and an X-series body, the 27mm f/2.8 could be a reasonable compromise. Tweet It

Of course, the 27mm f/2.8 has its drawbacks. The missing aperture ring can create awkward compatibility issues with select X-series bodies, and it’s also significantly more expensive than similar lenses from competing systems. Canon’s EF-S 24mm f/2.8 lens immediately springs to mind; at $149.99, it’s a bargain by comparison.

Though the optical performance just about justifies the $450 MSRP, it's not the easiest pill to swallow, as there are simply better-performing lenses in Fuji’s system for similar money. But if you’re married to Fuji’s X-series camera and desperate for something more portable, the XF 27mm f/2.8 will do the trick.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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