lenses
Expert Score
8.4

Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM Lens Review

A heck of an investment, but also a heck of a lens.

Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle looney
May 27, 2015
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

Deciding whether to invest in a pro-grade lens—especially when you're not a professional photographer—is a tough choice. It takes a special kind of crazy to think about dropping nearly $1,500 on a piece of glass, but if you're crazy about photography it's tempting nonetheless.

If you’re feeling the temptation and own a Canon DSLR (particularly a full-frame model), there are few options better than the Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM (MSRP $1,479).

One of Canon’s best-performing all-around lenses, the 35mm f/1.4L USM is razor sharp in the center, produces minimal geometric distortion, and has one of the most flexible fixed focal lengths around, regardless of whether you've got an entry-level Rebel or a 5D Mark III.

While the 35mm f/1.4 is a significant investment, it’s one that will start paying dividends almost immediately. In our lab and in real world shooting situations, we found it to be one of the best lenses we’d used to date for capturing landscapes and architecture, though a few minor flaws mean this one is just short of perfection.

Who's It For?

The Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM is best suited to photographers who need a high-performance, razor-sharp lens with a normal focal length and fast maximum aperture. It’s lightweight, compact, and superbly well-built, with weather-sealing throughout. Though the exterior is mostly plastic, there's no doubt that this is tough as nails on the inside.

Canon 35mm f/1.4 Ring
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
See that red ring? Yep, that means you're looking at a Canon L lens.

While the 35mm focal length (on full-frame cameras, or about 56mm effective on Canon's APS-C DSLRs) isn’t ideal for specialist applications like headshot portraits and most sports photography, it can tackle a wide range of other tasks. Architecture, landscapes, people shots, street photography, and event coverage are all possible, making the 35mm f/1.4L a stellar choice for a first prime lens.

The f/1.4 maximum aperture is also a huge draw, letting you get sharp, noise-free results in much dimmer conditions than you could with a kit lens or even a pro zoom like Canon's EF 24-70mm f/2.8L II. Aside from low-light capability, the wide aperture also creates beautiful bokeh, or out-of-focus areas, with creamy smoothness that really makes your subject pop.

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Look and Feel

If you’ve ever used any of Canon's L-series lenses, you know exactly what to expect here: solid build quality, smooth and confident operation, short focus throw, and tough weather sealing. As a prime lens without image stabilization (not a big loss on a relatively wide, very fast prime), there aren’t many physical controls. Still, the few that are present are very well-designed.

Canon 35mm f/1.4 Switch
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
Unlike some newer lenses, the 35mm f/1.4L doesn't provide a setting for manual focus override while using autofocus.

The “USM” designation in the model name indicates the presence of an internal ultrasonic focusing motor, which was fast, quiet, and reliably accurate on the 5D Mark III we tested the lens with. There's a handy switch on the side of the lens that lets you activate or disable the AF motor, though sadly there's no "M/A"-style manual focus override.

These quibbles aside, there's not a lot to complain about here. Canon had a simple mission and, as it usually does with its L-series lenses, it executed. Everything about this lens is as tight and polished as you'd expect, given the high price point.

Image Quality

The Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L is, by nearly every objective standard, an excellent lens. In our lab tests it recorded some truly stunning results, with tack-sharp images at most apertures and astonishingly low distortion. It does have some moderate issues with chromatic aberration, but the bokeh is also quite nice for this type of lens—though like many wide-normal primes it does get a bit "busy" looking with particularly messy backgrounds.

We were consistently impressed with how well the 35mm f/1.4L resolved on the Canon 5D Mark III. It produced some of the sharpest images we've seen from that camera, excelling across the frame from f/2.8 to 8 and in the center at the widest apertures. The corners are quite soft at f/1.4, as you'd expect, but the center is extremely usable.

The Sigma 35mm f/1.4 proved slightly sharper in our tests, but it's quite close between the two. The Canon is more expensive, but I prefer the way it handles and the character of the images that it creates. It's also fully weather-sealed, so you can get beautiful landscapes even in inclement weather.

Most impressively for a relatively wide lens, the 35mm f/1.4L produces almost no distortion. It does have some field curvature issues with regard to focus, however. It's not a big deal if you're photographing subjects at a distance—like landscapes and architecture—but up close it's hard to get the centers and corners in focus at the same time.

Below you can see sample photos taken with the Canon EF 35mm f/1.4L USM mounted on a Canon EOS 5D Mark III. Click the link below each photo to download the full-resolution image.

Conclusion

At $1,479, the Canon 35mm f/1.4L USM is a lens that only well-heeled hobbyists and professional photographers will be able to afford. If it’s within your means, it’s an ideal choice for an all-purpose prime. It's sharp, usable even in very dim lighting, and provides some of the best bokeh you’ll get from a standard lens.

Canon 35mm f/1.4 Front
Credit: Reviewed.com / Kyle Looney
The wide f/1.4 maximum aperture makes this a great lens for both low-light shooting and shallow depth of field applications.

This lens can also pull double duty as a "fast fifty" if you’ve got something like an EOS 7D Mark II as your backup camera. It’s even sharper in these situations, since the corners and edges of the frame are cropped away, eliminating this lens's one major weak spot.

But despite how good this lens is, it’s really only worth the price if you absolutely must have weather sealing, or if you simply won't settle for anything less than L-series lenses. Third-party options like the Sigma 35mm f/1.4 cost significantly less, and while they may not be quite as durable, they often provide equivalent or even superior performance.

If you don't need f/1.4, consider Canon's EF 35mm f/2, which was recently updated with image stabilization. At just $549, it gets you most of the way to f/1.4 and also provides very good image quality in a much smaller package.

Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.
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Our editors review and recommend products to help you buy the stuff you need. If you make a purchase by clicking one of our links, we may earn a small share of the revenue. Our picks and opinions are independent from any business incentives.

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